Rivers Program Information


Rivers6

PA Scenic Rivers Act

P.L. 1277, Act No. 283 as amended by Act 110, May 7, 1982.

 
 

Classification Criteria

Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). A designated river may have more than one classification; each segment will have its own classification, and must be long enough to provide a meaningful experience. The number of different classified segments within the river should be kept to a minimum.

WILD or SCENIC river designations are intended to preserve the primitive qualities the natural, and aesthetic values of a river and to protect the existing character and quality of both the river and its adjacent land environment.

Wild rivers shall be free-flowing and supportive of native fish and wildlife. The shorelines and adjacent environment shall be pristine in character. Access to segments is restricted to foot and/or nonpowered watercraft.

Scenic rivers shall be free-flowing and capable of, or under restoration, to support water-cased recreation, fish and aquatic life. The view from the river or its banks shall be predominately wild, but may reveal some pastoral countryside. The segment may be intermittently accessible by road.

PASTORAL river designation is intended to recognize the capability and productivity of agricultural activities. The surrounding pastoral landscape enhances the aesthetic qualities of this river type.

Pastoral rivers shall be free-flowing excepting historic or restored mill dams and capable of, or under restoration, to support water based recreation, fish and aquatic life. The view from the river or its banks shall be predominately pastoral of farming countryside. The segment may be intermittently accessible by roads.

RECREATIONAL and MODIFIED RECREATIONAL designations are intended to maintain the utilization of the river and its adjacent land environment for recreational uses. Such use however, must be compatible with the capability of the resource to support that use without degradation.

Recreational rivers may combine free-flowing and relatively short stretches of impounded water that can, or is being restored to, sustain appropriate water-based recreation, fish and aquatic life. The shorelines may exhibit considerable man-made modification; however, such modification shall be compatible with the aesthetics of the river environment. The river shall be readily accessible.