Washington Crossing Historic Park


Re-enactors portray Washington's crossing of the Delaware River in this thumbnail at Washington Crossing Historic Park, Pennsylvania.

Educational Programs

Washington Crossing Historic Park offers a wide variety of activity-oriented programs for students, teachers, adult groups, and individuals. The rich history of the park can also be explored through wayside exhibits and displays and guided tours.

 

Washington Crossing Park preserves the site of George Washington’s dramatic boat crossing of the Delaware River during the American Revolution and is a National Historic Landmark.

The Upper Section of the park has historic buildings, walking paths, picnic pavilions, fishing, and historical and environmental education programs.

The Lower Section of the park has historic buildings, walking paths, picnicking, picnic pavilions, fishing, non-motorized boat launching, outdoor recreation programs, historical and environmental education programs, and hosts special events and re-enactments.

Parts of the park are operated by the Friends of Washington Crossing and may charge a fee. Other parts of the park are free and open sunrise to sunset. www.washingtoncrossingpark.org

Nearby Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve showcases the extraordinary diversity of plants native to Pennsylvania. An entrance fee is charged. www.bhwp.org


Walking   -  Picnicking   -  Boating   -  Fishing   -  Biking   -  Sightseeing   -  Cross-country Skiing

Picnicking: Picnic tables are throughout the Upper and Lower sections of the park. Five picnic pavilions provide shelter for group picnics.


Boating: Non-motorized canoes and kayaks may be launched onto the Delaware River and the Delaware Canal.

CAUTION - The river poses natural hazards and visitors should use caution on and around the river.

Non-powered boats must display one of the following: boat registration; launching permit or mooring permit from Pennsylvania State Parks, available at most state park offices; launching permit from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission laws apply. Complete information on boating rules and regulations in Pennsylvania is available from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission Web site.


Fishing: The Delaware River contains many species of game fish including American shad, striped bass, smallmouth bass, and walleye. Shad migration starts in early spring. The Delaware Canal is a warmwater fishery.

PSunlight pierces autumn-colored leaves by a walking path at Washington Crossing Historic Park, Pennsylvania.ennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission laws apply. Complete information on fishing rules and regulations in Pennsylvania is available from the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission Web site.


Walking: Visitors can explore forests, fields, and historic structures along several pathways throughout both sections of the park, including the historic Taylorsville Village. The 60-mile long Delaware Canal State Park towpath runs from Easton to Bristol with a 5-mile section that connects the lower and upper portions of Washington Crossing Historic Park. Once trod by mule teams pulling cargo-laden boats along the canal, the towpath is used today by walkers, joggers, bicyclists, cross-country skiers and bird watchers. It can be accessed from Washington Crossing Historic Park at SR 532 in the lower section or at the Thompson-Neely House of the upper section.


Biking: The 60-mile long Delaware Canal towpath runs from Easton to Bristol and is a National Recreation Trail. Once trod by mule teams pulling cargo-laden boats along the canal, the towpath is used today by walkers, joggers, bicyclists, cross-country skiers, and bird watchers..


Cross-country Skiing: The stone Bowman's Hill Tower is taller than the trees at Washington Crossing State Historic Site, Pennsylvania.The paths and fields of the park are suitable for cross-country skiing when weather conditions permit.

The 60-mile long Delaware Canal towpath runs from Easton to Bristol and is a National Recreation Trail. Once trod by mule teams pulling cargo-laden boats along the canal, the towpath is used today by walkers, joggers, bicyclists, cross-country skiers, and bird watchers. The towpath connects the upper and lower parks.


Sightseeing: The 125-foot Bowman’s Hill Tower, located in the Upper Section off of Lurgan Road, provides a fabulous view of the Delaware River Valley. An entry fee is charged. The tower closes for the winter season. www.bhwp.org


Access for People with Disabilities


The ADA symbol indicates that this activity or structure is ADA accessible.If you need an accommodation to participate in park activities due to a disability, please contact the park you plan to visit.